Provisional Tax – how does it work?

Provisional Tax – how does it work? 

If you had to pay tax of more than $5,000 in your last income tax return, you may have to pay provisional tax for the following year. Provisional tax is like paying progress payments on next year’s income tax.

The amount you have to pay relates to your expected profit for the year. In practical terms, the amount of provisional tax you’re expected to pay is based on the tax you were liable for in the previous year, often referred to as residual income tax (RIT).

Even if you are not required to pay provisional tax, you may still elect to do so, to spread your tax obligations over the year. This can help you manage cash flow and take away the pressure of paying a lump sum at the end of the year.

For a new business, the first-year provisional tax payment can be tough. You must pay last year’s income tax at the same time as the first instalment of next year’s provisional tax. There are a couple of ways we can help you reduce the pain.

If you are self-employed or a partner in a partnership you may be entitled to a discount of 6.7% on your first year’s income tax. This is to encourage you to pay tax early and relieve the financial strain before you must pay provisional tax for the first time.

COVID-19 and provisional tax

In order to shrink compliance costs for smaller taxpayers and allow them to retain cash for longer, the government has introduced some tax relief measures that affect the normal rules for provisional tax:

  • The threshold for provisional tax increased from $2,500 to $5,000 from the 2020/21 tax year. This means any current provisional taxpayers with provisional tax payments of less than $5,000 will have until 7 February following the year they file to pay their tax bill.
  • Depreciation for commercial and industrial buildings is reintroduced from the 2021/22 income year. If you are a building owner, you will be able to adjust provisional tax payments immediately in anticipation of additional deductions that become available.
  • If your business is affected by COVID-19 and:
    • you need to re-estimate your provisional tax as your income falls short of the estimate and provisional tax has been overpaid, it may be possible to arrange early refunds.
    • if you are unable to pay tax by the due date, Inland Revenue has discretion to write-off penalties and interest. You may be eligible for a UOMI (use of money interest) write off.

It’s important to keep your tax plan current. If circumstances change for your business, we need to adjust your plan. Let us know as soon as you can about the situation for your business.

Please ensure you check with your Accountant regarding the information above – they are best to advise you on this.

Maximising your cash reserves

Maximising your cash reserves

The Covid-19 crisis has highlighted the inadequacy of current cash reserves for many businesses. They simply don’t have enough cash to sustain the business in a crisis.

Now is the time to make permanent change to your business processes and cost structure so you can build those reserves. At the same time, business owners need to be part of a world solution, and that means paying our bills on time where possible.

11 strategies to maximise your cash reserves:

  1. Invoice your customers immediately upon supply of products and services. The faster you bill, the faster you’ll be paid.
  2. Shorten your payment terms, e.g. from 20th of the month to within 7 days of invoice. You’ll need to reflect any changes in your Terms of Trade, in key customer contracts, and on your website.
  3. Invoice directly from your accounting software. This can enable faster payment.
  4. Negotiate prompt payment discounts with your suppliers. Don’t be bashful, there is no harm in asking.
  5. Get better at collecting the money you’re owed. Ask nicely to be paid by customers as soon as an invoice is overdue. The fast cash is in the 30-day column, not the 90-day column.
  6. Outsource proactive debtor management to a collection agency. This can be surprisingly cost-effective.
  7. Perform credit checks on new customers and make sure your Terms of Trade give you as much protection as possible if a debt goes bad. For example, put personal guarantees in place.
  8. Develop a personal spending budget and stick to it. This will reduce cashflow pressure on the business.
  9. Take costs out of the business where you can, but only where you should. This is an ideal time to review every line item in your Profit and Loss Statement. The shift to working online may allow you to change spending patterns.
  10. Have clear spending limits for team members who incur expenses on behalf of your business and regularly monitor these.
  11. And finally, prepare a Cashflow Forecast. Know what’s ahead of you and understand how positive changes will improve your cash reserves going forward.

Cash is oxygen for your business. Contact us now so we can help you put a cashflow improvement plan in place.

“The more a business owner knows about their cashflow, the more empowered they become.” – Nick Chandi

Successfully implement change in your business

Successfully implement change in your business 

Research by Kotter International found that more than 70% of change projects within a business fail. Why is this?

The research findings show that employee engagement is the biggest factor. Whether it is a small change to one or two processes, or a company-wide change, it’s common for staff to feel intimidated by it.

So what can you do for successful implementation of change? Here are the principals from Kotter’s 8-Step Program:

1. Get the team onboard

Build support and create momentum behind the changes you are making by communicating the benefits with the whole company early on.

  • Start honest discussions with your team and give dynamic and convincing reasons to get people talking and thinking about the change.
  • Demonstrate what would happen if you didn’t make the change and what else it could affect in the future.
  • Request support from customers in this instance who may love the product, outside stakeholders and others known in the industry to strengthen your argument.

Kotter suggests that 75 percent of a company’s management needs to support a change in order to succeed.

2. Form a powerful coalition from all areas of the business

Share the support you have from all areas in the business (not just the leadership team). Visible support from key people within the organisation will bring others on board and create a sense of urgency. Give these people key roles in the change process to help progress it.

Once formed, your “change coalition” needs to work as a team, continuing to build urgency and momentum around the need for change.

What you can do:

  • Identify the influencers in your organisation for this change, as well as your key stakeholders.
  • Ensure that you have a good mix of people from different levels within your firm.
  • Ask for a commitment from these key people.
  • Work on team building within your change coalition.

3. Create a vision for change

Create an overall vision that helps everyone understand why you’re asking them to do something.

What you can do:

  • Develop a short summary (one or two sentences) that captures what you “see” as the future of your organisation.
  • Create a strategy to execute that vision.
  • Ensure that your team leading the change are all on the same page.

4. Communicate the vision

Embed this in everything you do so it is not lost in the day-to-day operation but a powerful part of this.

What you can do:

  • Talk often about vision and change.
  • Make sure the vision is applied to all aspects of the operations. For example, ensure it’s added to the training and induction program and is encapsulated into the relevant job descriptions and evaluations.
  • Address people’s concerns and anxieties about it openly and honestly.
  • Lead by example.

5. Remove obstacles

Check constantly for processes and structures that need to adjust to allow you to execute the vision and help the change move forward.

What you can do:

  • Look at your organisational structure, job descriptions, and performance and compensation systems to ensure they’re in line with your vision.
  • Recognise and reward people for making change happen.
  • Identify, or hire, change managers whose core role is to deliver the change.
  • Identify areas or team members that stand in the way of change, and find solutions.
  • Take action to quickly remove barriers rather than letting them fester.

6. Create short-term wins

Create short-term targets – not just one long-term goal. Each “win” that you produce can further motivate all the staff especially if it’s a big change requiring a longer process and help keep them on task.

What you can do:

  • Reward people who help you meet the targets.
  • Look for sure-fire projects that you can implement without help from any strong critics of the change.
  • Don’t choose early targets that are expensive. You want to be able to justify the investment in each project.

7. Build on the change

Keep looking for improvements to the system to ensure the long term goals are achieved.

What you can do:

  • After every win, analyse what went right, and what needs improving.
  • Set goals to continue building on the momentum you’ve achieved.
  • Develop a culture of continuous improvement.
  • Keep ideas fresh by bringing in new people to lead the change.

8. Anchor the changes in your culture

Finally, to make any change stick, it should become part of the core of your organisation. Make continuous efforts to ensure that the change is seen in every aspect, giving it a solid place in your organisation. It’s also important that your company’s leaders continue to support the change. This includes existing staff and new leaders who are brought in.

What you can do:

  • Talk about progress every chance you get. Tell success stories about the change process, and repeat other stories that you hear.
  • Include the change ideals and values when hiring and training new staff so it is enforced from the start.
  • Publicly recognise key members and enablers of the change.
  • Create plans to replace key leaders of change as they move on. This will help ensure that their legacy is not lost or forgotten.

Making data meaningful for your business

Making data meaningful for your business

Data is only powerful with context, it needs to be accurate and organised and you need to be clear on the necessities vs the niceties.

Three steps to ensuring data is meaningful for your business

Raw data describes the facts and figures that a business processes every day. Over time, every business hoards a certain amount of data and it only becomes meaningful to a business after it has been processed to add context, relevance and purpose.

For example, in a restaurant, every order will be recorded. However, a restaurant won’t learn much by looking at each one in isolation. Analysis of the orders will reveal trends and patterns, such as peak dining days or biggest-selling menu or bar items. Knowledge of the business comes from the relationship between the singular pieces of information. That restaurant owner may know to do their biggest stock order on a Wednesday by analysing their covers and establishing that sales increase by 38% on Thursdays.

The pace of business in today’s technological times requires businesses to be able to react quickly to changing demands from customers and environmental conditions. The ability to be able to compile, analyse and act on data is increasingly important. In some instances, a high volume of data may need to be accumulated and analysed before trends and patterns emerge, like a particular season’s most popular dish.

When you aren’t compiling accurate business data, you can only rely on gut feel and assumptions about past performance to inform your future business decisions.

If your business is already using cloud software for accountancy, project management system or CRM, it’s likely that you’re sitting on a goldmine of data. If properly utilised, this data can greatly aid running a successful business. You’ll have valuable insight into your sales, expenses, profit and staff efficiencies that can help you answer critical questions and drive smart business decisions.

Every business is unique, but here are three quick tips to help you drive data in your business.

1. Data is only powerful if there is context – can you stop to answer these questions?

  • What is your primary objective (business or personal)?
  • What is happening in the business?
  • What isn’t happening?
  • How can you influence what happens?

Figure out what you’re currently trying to achieve before anything else. It’s important to periodically go back and ask yourself these questions and what goals develop from the answers, as answers evolve over time. You may have started out with your primary objective as running the best restaurant in your area. However as time has passed, your primary objective might now be to take time away from the business to spend more time with your children.

2. The only way your data can help you drive your business is if it’s accurate and organised appropriately – ask yourself:

  • Are your financials up-to-date?
  • Do you have any unreconciled transactions?
  • Are you tax compliant?
  • Are your staff trained on what systems and processes to use for different parts of your business?
  • Are your cloud systems being correctly utilised?

The worst thing you can do is to attempt to analyse incorrect data and attempt to make decisions for the business based on it! Tools like Spotlight Reporting can help you with the reports you need for business decisions.

3. Understand what the data necessities are and what the niceties are.

  • What would you most like to understand about your business?
  • What figures pinpoint success for you?
  • What are your objectives over the next six to twelve months, and two to five years?

Remember, to focus on what truly matters and build from there. If you want help with the process, we can accumulate, analyse, report and advise on your data; or show you the tools to use.

14 Apps to Help Improve Your Business’ Productivity

14 Apps to Help Improve Your Business’ Productivity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We seem busier than ever without necessarily achieving much more. It’s time you made technology work for you, to save time and streamline processes. We have rounded up some of the best apps to maximise your productivity by addressing your communication, organisation, password management, performance and focus.

COMMUNICATION – the heart of modern business

Slack is a communication hub – calls, instant messages, files and notifications all indexed, archived and easily searchable. Create dedicated channels for groups or individual projects and private lines for sensitive information.

Skype is a leader in video conferencing. Send instant messages and make calls. With Skype you have your own number and you can share your screen for presentations etc.

WhatsApp is just like SMS (text) but using the internet not a cellular account. Instant messaging, sharing media files, free app-to-app calls and easy to download – all good reasons to use it.

ORGANISATION – simplify your workload

Evernote keeps a variety of notes on one subject all together. From audio or web pages to scanned business cards it can even search text in images. Keep project research/information together and share if required.

Trello is a project management tool. Keep track of progress, due dates etc – it’s easy and visual for the whole team.

Google Drive is an easily integrated and shared document storage on the cloud will centrally hold files that you and others can edit in real time from any on-line device.

Genius Scan turns your phone pics into a pdf. File documents and receipts easiy on the cloud.

PASSWORD MANAGEMENT – no more password resets

LastPass is a virtual vault that holds all your passwords and is encrypted for maximum security and works on all your devices, generating super secure passwords and making online shopping easier.

1Password has recently introduced a ‘travel mode’ – all traces of your ‘vault’ of sensitive information are removed from your device while in travel mode so your data is untraceable.

PERFORMANCE – shine with little effort

Detective is an assistant who briefs you before every meeting on who’s who and what makes them tick.

Accompany will give you an executive pre-meeting briefing – background on the people you meet and financials on companies.

IMPROVE FOCUS – tune in to turn off

Pocket is where you keep things for later. Videos, articles etc can be stored to view at leisure, even without an internet connection.

Freedom releases you from the tyranny of distracting sites so your devices become work tools again.

Simple Habit offers guided meditation in sessions as snackable as 5 minutes to improve stress or sleeping through mindfulness.

If you would like to chat further about how your business processes could be running more efficiently, send us a message or call us on 0800 463 488.